Text 23 Apr 97 notes

queen-margaery-tyrell:

mercurialcreations:

queen-margaery-tyrell:

My biggest takeaway from reading Carl Sagan’s works is that had anything happened to Ann Druyan, he would have become a Batman villain overnight.

image

Challenge accepted.

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[[ click here for full size ]]

I am so incredibly happy, you guys.

Photo 23 Apr 2,413 notes

(Source: stepo2008)

Photo 22 Apr 1,760 notes 
Cole Porter and Audrey Hepburn at the Roman Holiday Premiere, 1953

Cole Porter and Audrey Hepburn at the Roman Holiday Premiere, 1953

(Source: missingaudrey)

Video 22 Apr 576 notes

applepiesfromscratch:

inspired by this

Photo 22 Apr 243 notes
Photo 22 Apr 177 notes sak-it:

Zeppelin <3

sak-it:

Zeppelin <3

Video 21 Apr 314,381 notes
Photo 20 Apr 331 notes distant-traveller:

Magnifying the distant universe

Galaxy clusters are some of the most massive structures that can be found in the Universe — large groups of galaxies bound together by gravity. This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveals one of these clusters, known as MACS J0454.1-0300. Each of the bright spots seen here is a galaxy, and each is home to many millions, or even billions, of stars.
Astronomers have determined the mass of MACS J0454.1-0300 to be around 180 trillion times the mass of the Sun. Clusters like this are so massive that their gravity can even change the behaviour of space around them, bending the path of light as it travels through them, sometimes amplifying it and acting like a cosmic magnifying glass. Thanks to this effect, it is possible to see objects that are so far away from us that they would otherwise be too faint to be detected.
In this case, several objects appear to be dramatically elongated and are seen as sweeping arcs to the left of this image. These are galaxies located at vast distances behind the cluster — their image has been amplified, but also distorted, as their light passes through MACS J0454.1-0300. This process, known as gravitational lensing, is an extremely valuable tool for astronomers as they peer at very distant objects.
This effect will be put to good use with the start of Hubble’s Frontier Fields program over the next few years, which aims to explore very distant objects located behind lensing clusters, similar to MACS J0454.1-0300, to investigate how stars and galaxies formed and evolved in the early Universe.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble &amp; NASA; Acknowledgement: Nick Rose

distant-traveller:

Magnifying the distant universe

Galaxy clusters are some of the most massive structures that can be found in the Universe — large groups of galaxies bound together by gravity. This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveals one of these clusters, known as MACS J0454.1-0300. Each of the bright spots seen here is a galaxy, and each is home to many millions, or even billions, of stars.

Astronomers have determined the mass of MACS J0454.1-0300 to be around 180 trillion times the mass of the Sun. Clusters like this are so massive that their gravity can even change the behaviour of space around them, bending the path of light as it travels through them, sometimes amplifying it and acting like a cosmic magnifying glass. Thanks to this effect, it is possible to see objects that are so far away from us that they would otherwise be too faint to be detected.

In this case, several objects appear to be dramatically elongated and are seen as sweeping arcs to the left of this image. These are galaxies located at vast distances behind the cluster — their image has been amplified, but also distorted, as their light passes through MACS J0454.1-0300. This process, known as gravitational lensing, is an extremely valuable tool for astronomers as they peer at very distant objects.

This effect will be put to good use with the start of Hubble’s Frontier Fields program over the next few years, which aims to explore very distant objects located behind lensing clusters, similar to MACS J0454.1-0300, to investigate how stars and galaxies formed and evolved in the early Universe.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgement: Nick Rose

(Source: spacetelescope.org)

via Δ S > 0.
Video 20 Apr 225,088 notes

sh1re:

happy easter

Video 20 Apr 960 notes

(Source: lalie)


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